Get to Know the National Center’s Board of Directors
We are starting a monthly series to highlight members of the National Center’s Board of Directors. Our first installment is with one of our newest members, Charlie Galbraith, who joined the Board in March. We hope you enjoy getting to know Charlie – an attorney, baseball player, and mountain climber – better.

  1. Tell us a little bit about yourself and your work in Indian Country.

I’m a member of the Navajo Nation and I’ve worked on Indian law and policy for the majority of my career. After about a decade in the federal government, where I worked for a US Senator, as an Assistant United States Attorney, and in the Obama White House, I joined the law firm Kilpatrick Townsend’s Native American Practice Group. After so much time in government, it’s a been a welcome change to be working directly with tribes and becoming deeply involved with some of the major challenges facing specific tribes.

2. What made you interested in joining the National Center’s Board of Directors?

I’ve long watched and appreciated the work the National Center was doing for Indian Country and I’ve known National Center President and CEO Chris James from our time in the Obama Administration. So when the opportunity to join the Board arose, I had to jump at it.
3. What have you enjoyed about your experience on the Board so far?

Getting to know my fellow Board members – a collection of great leaders for economic development in Indian Country – and learning from their experience in setting up a lot of the institutions and programs that I’ve benefited from in the past.

4. What’s the one piece of advice or words of encouragement you would give to a young professional who wants to get more involved in his or her tribe, or the broader American Indian and Alaska Native community?

I’ll keep this one simple – participate in the National Center’s events and programs!

5. When you’re not working or attending Board meetings and other National Center events, where can we find you? What are your hobbies?

Getting outdoors or playing some sport or another. I still play competitive baseball in a league were a good portion of the players are half my age, run two or three marathons per year, and try to climb at least one significant mountain a year.